Other Ways to Help With CINV

Medicines are important to help prevent and treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). There are also some other things you can do to help with your nausea and vomiting1,2:

Eat a bland diet

Choose foods and beverages that are less likely to upset your stomach, such as crackers, toast, broth, oatmeal, boiled potatoes, white rice, gelatin, and tea.

Stay away from very hot and very cold foods

Let hot meals cool down and refrigerated foods sit at room temperature before you eat them.

Avoid strong tastes and smells

Stay away from foods and beverages with a strong taste or smell, such as coffee, fish, onions, and garlic. Instead, try foods that smell nice, such as lemon drops or mints.

Suck on ice chips or popsicles

Repeated nausea and vomiting can sometimes lead to dehydration. Eating ice chips and popsicles can help keep you hydrated.

Eat smaller meals more often

Instead of 3 large meals a day, try eating 5 or 6 small meals or snacks. Avoid lying down right after you eat.

Eat before treatment if it helps you feel better

Some people feel better when they eat a light meal or snack before their chemotherapy treatment. Others feel better when they avoid eating before their treatment. Find out what works best for you.

Relax

Stay as calm as you can before chemotherapy appointments. Try relaxing activities, such as reading, knitting, or listening to music. Practice deep breathing exercises, meditate, or picture images that make you feel peaceful.

Get fresh air

When you feel nauseous, sometimes going outside for some fresh air can help you feel better.

Talk to your health care team

If the steps you're taking to help with your nausea and vomiting are not working, be sure to tell your health care team members. If they know there's still a problem, they can help fix it.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and see below for important risk information.

References:

  1. American Cancer Society. Nutrition for the person with cancer. Available at: www.cancer.org/docroot/MBC/content/MBC_6_2X_When_Youre_Feeling_Queasy.asp?sitearea=MBC. Accessed March 2, 2010.
  2. National Cancer Institute. Side effects and ways to manage them. Available at: www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/chemotherapy-and-you/page7#SE11. Accessed March 2, 2010.

Cesamet Indication

  • Cesamet is a medicine for nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy. It is used when other drugs have not been able to control these symptoms. The scientific name of Cesamet is nabilone.
  • Doctors prescribe other drugs first because Cesamet can affect your mental state. Other nausea and vomiting drugs usually do not have this kind of side effect.
  • Cesamet can affect your mental state, so you should take it around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet and if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Cesamet can be abused, so there are laws about how doctors can prescribe it. Prescriptions for Cesamet should last for just a few days.
  • Your doctor might watch you for signs of abusing Cesamet. If you or a family member has ever abused drugs or had a mental illness, you might have a higher risk of abusing Cesamet.
  • Only take Cesamet when your doctor told you to. It should not be the first drug you take for nausea and vomiting.

Cesamet Important Risk Information

  • Do not take Cesamet if you are allergic to any of its ingredients or any other cannabinoids.
  • The effects of Cesamet last longer in some people than others. Mental side effects could last for 2 or 3 days after you stop taking it.
  • Cesamet works in your brain. You might feel dizzy, sleepy, "high", uncoordinated, anxious, confused, or depressed while taking Cesamet. You might also hear or see things that are not real.
  • Cesamet can make your heart race or blood pressure drop. Ask your doctor about this if you are older or have high blood pressure or heart disease.
  • Cesamet affects people differently. You should take Cesamet around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet or if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Do not drive, use machines, or do other activities that could be dangerous until you know how Cesamet affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol, take sleeping pills, or take other medicines that affect your brain while you are taking Cesamet. If you do, the side effects of Cesamet could be worse.
  • Talk to your doctor if you have ever had depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or another mental disorder. Cesamet could bring out the symptoms of these illnesses.
  • Cesamet is similar to marijuana. Tell your doctor if you ever abused or were dependent on alcohol or marijuana.
  • Cesamet has not been studied in pregnant women, nursing mothers, or children. These patients should be careful when taking Cesamet.
  • Cesamet can change heart rhythms. The effects of these changes in heart rhythms are not known.
  • In scientific studies, most patients who took Cesamet had at least one side effect. The most common side effects were sleepiness, dizziness, dry mouth, a "high" feeling, an uncoordinated feeling, a headache, and problems concentrating.

Cesamet Important Risk Information

  • Do not take Cesamet if you are allergic to any of its ingredients or any other cannabinoids.
  • The effects of Cesamet last longer in some people than others. Mental side effects could last for 2 or 3 days after you stop taking it.
  • Cesamet works in your brain. You might feel dizzy, sleepy, "high", uncoordinated, anxious, confused, or depressed while taking Cesamet. You might also hear or see things that are not real.
  • Cesamet can make your heart race or blood pressure drop. Ask your doctor about this if you are older or have high blood pressure or heart disease.
  • Cesamet affects people differently. You should take Cesamet around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet or if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Do not drive, use machines, or do other activities that could be dangerous until you know how Cesamet affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol, take sleeping pills, or take other medicines that affect your brain while you are taking Cesamet. If you do, the side effects of Cesamet could be worse.
  • Talk to your doctor if you have ever had depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or another mental disorder. Cesamet could bring out the symptoms of these illnesses.
  • Cesamet is similar to marijuana. Tell your doctor if you ever abused or were dependent on alcohol or marijuana.
  • Cesamet has not been studied in pregnant women, nursing mothers, or children. These patients should be careful when taking Cesamet.
  • Cesamet can change heart rhythms. The effects of these changes in heart rhythms are not known.
  • In scientific studies, most patients who took Cesamet had at least one side effect. The most common side effects were sleepiness, dizziness, dry mouth, a "high" feeling, an uncoordinated feeling, a headache, and problems concentrating.

Cesamet Indication

  • Cesamet is a medicine for nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy. It is used when other drugs have not been able to control these symptoms. The scientific name of Cesamet is nabilone.
  • Doctors prescribe other drugs first because Cesamet can affect your mental state. Other nausea and vomiting drugs usually do not have this kind of side effect.
  • Cesamet can affect your mental state, so you should take it around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet and if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Cesamet can be abused, so there are laws about how doctors can prescribe it. Prescriptions for Cesamet should last for just a few days.
  • Your doctor might watch you for signs of abusing Cesamet. If you or a family member has ever abused drugs or had a mental illness, you might have a higher risk of abusing Cesamet.
  • Only take Cesamet when your doctor told you to. It should not be the first drug you take for nausea and vomiting.