More Resources for Patients and Caregivers

The materials listed below contain detailed information about Cesamet and its role in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). To download these materials, simply click "Download Now" below.

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Cesamet Patient Brochure

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This booklet includes important information about CINV and Cesamet.

Listed below are a number of organizations available to help patients and caregivers learn more about CINV and Cesamet. Just click on the links below to visit their Web sites.

American Cancer Society
The American Cancer Society is the nationwide community-based voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service. For more information, call 1-800-ACS-2345 or click on the link above to visit this organization's Web site.

CancerCare
The national nonprofit CancerCare provides professional counseling, online and telephone support, educational information, and financial assistance to cancer patients and survivors, families, caregivers, and the bereaved. All services are offered free of charge. For more information, click on the link to its Web site or call 1-800-813-HOPE (4673).

LIVESTRONG
LIVESTRONG offers free, confidential, one-on-one support online or by phone. Comprehensive consultations are available in Spanish and in English. Call 1-866-235-7205 or click on the link to visit the LIVESTRONG Web site.

Patient Advocate Foundation
This national nonprofit organization works with patients and their insurers, employers, or creditors to help ensure access to care, maintenance of employment, and preservation of financial stability. To learn more about this organization, click on the link to its Web site.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure
As the world's largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists, this organization works to save lives, empower people, ensure quality care for all, and energize science to find the cures. Also the largest source of nonprofit funds dedicated to the fight against breast cancer in the world. To learn more about this organization, click on the link to its Web site.

Glossary
A glossary of terms related to cancer, CINV, and Cesamet is available on this Web site.

Please see Full Prescribing Information and see below for important risk information.

Cesamet Indication

  • Cesamet is a medicine for nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy. It is used when other drugs have not been able to control these symptoms. The scientific name of Cesamet is nabilone.
  • Doctors prescribe other drugs first because Cesamet can affect your mental state. Other nausea and vomiting drugs usually do not have this kind of side effect.
  • Cesamet can affect your mental state, so you should take it around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet and if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Cesamet can be abused, so there are laws about how doctors can prescribe it. Prescriptions for Cesamet should last for just a few days.
  • Your doctor might watch you for signs of abusing Cesamet. If you or a family member has ever abused drugs or had a mental illness, you might have a higher risk of abusing Cesamet.
  • Only take Cesamet when your doctor told you to. It should not be the first drug you take for nausea and vomiting.

Cesamet Important Risk Information

  • Do not take Cesamet if you are allergic to any of its ingredients or any other cannabinoids.
  • The effects of Cesamet last longer in some people than others. Mental side effects could last for 2 or 3 days after you stop taking it.
  • Cesamet works in your brain. You might feel dizzy, sleepy, "high", uncoordinated, anxious, confused, or depressed while taking Cesamet. You might also hear or see things that are not real.
  • Cesamet can make your heart race or blood pressure drop. Ask your doctor about this if you are older or have high blood pressure or heart disease.
  • Cesamet affects people differently. You should take Cesamet around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet or if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Do not drive, use machines, or do other activities that could be dangerous until you know how Cesamet affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol, take sleeping pills, or take other medicines that affect your brain while you are taking Cesamet. If you do, the side effects of Cesamet could be worse.
  • Talk to your doctor if you have ever had depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or another mental disorder. Cesamet could bring out the symptoms of these illnesses.
  • Cesamet is similar to marijuana. Tell your doctor if you ever abused or were dependent on alcohol or marijuana.
  • Cesamet has not been studied in pregnant women, nursing mothers, or children. These patients should be careful when taking Cesamet.
  • Cesamet can change heart rhythms. The effects of these changes in heart rhythms are not known.
  • In scientific studies, most patients who took Cesamet had at least one side effect. The most common side effects were sleepiness, dizziness, dry mouth, a "high" feeling, an uncoordinated feeling, a headache, and problems concentrating.

Cesamet Important Risk Information

  • Do not take Cesamet if you are allergic to any of its ingredients or any other cannabinoids.
  • The effects of Cesamet last longer in some people than others. Mental side effects could last for 2 or 3 days after you stop taking it.
  • Cesamet works in your brain. You might feel dizzy, sleepy, "high", uncoordinated, anxious, confused, or depressed while taking Cesamet. You might also hear or see things that are not real.
  • Cesamet can make your heart race or blood pressure drop. Ask your doctor about this if you are older or have high blood pressure or heart disease.
  • Cesamet affects people differently. You should take Cesamet around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet or if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Do not drive, use machines, or do other activities that could be dangerous until you know how Cesamet affects you.
  • Do not drink alcohol, take sleeping pills, or take other medicines that affect your brain while you are taking Cesamet. If you do, the side effects of Cesamet could be worse.
  • Talk to your doctor if you have ever had depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or another mental disorder. Cesamet could bring out the symptoms of these illnesses.
  • Cesamet is similar to marijuana. Tell your doctor if you ever abused or were dependent on alcohol or marijuana.
  • Cesamet has not been studied in pregnant women, nursing mothers, or children. These patients should be careful when taking Cesamet.
  • Cesamet can change heart rhythms. The effects of these changes in heart rhythms are not known.
  • In scientific studies, most patients who took Cesamet had at least one side effect. The most common side effects were sleepiness, dizziness, dry mouth, a "high" feeling, an uncoordinated feeling, a headache, and problems concentrating.

Cesamet Indication

  • Cesamet is a medicine for nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy. It is used when other drugs have not been able to control these symptoms. The scientific name of Cesamet is nabilone.
  • Doctors prescribe other drugs first because Cesamet can affect your mental state. Other nausea and vomiting drugs usually do not have this kind of side effect.
  • Cesamet can affect your mental state, so you should take it around an adult you trust. This is most important when you first take Cesamet and if your doctor changes your dose.
  • Cesamet can be abused, so there are laws about how doctors can prescribe it. Prescriptions for Cesamet should last for just a few days.
  • Your doctor might watch you for signs of abusing Cesamet. If you or a family member has ever abused drugs or had a mental illness, you might have a higher risk of abusing Cesamet.
  • Only take Cesamet when your doctor told you to. It should not be the first drug you take for nausea and vomiting.